Mozambique

Photos
Photo credit: Associação Progresso
Photo credit: Ajuda de Desenvolvimento de Povo para Povo (ADPP)
Photo credit: Associação Progresso

The barriers girls face in Mozambique

Mozambique’s Ministry of Education reports that the overall literacy rate is 47 per cent, with female literacy at 28 per cent which lags far behind that of males at 60 per cent.

According to USAID, more than half of girls in primary school drop out by the fifth grade. Only 11 per cent continue to study at the secondary level, and only 1 per cent continue on to college. Among those who finish primary school, almost two-thirds complete without basic reading and writing skills.

Mozambique has very high ratio of girls dropping out of schools, and getting married at an early age.

Child marriage is more prevalent in the rural areas and heavily concentrated in the Northern and Central regions.  According to the 2011 Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS), 56 per cent of women aged 20 – 24 were married by the age of 18 in rural areas, compared with 36 per cent in the cities.

Marriage before the age of 18 was found to be particularly high in the provinces of Niassa, Cabo Delgado and Manica. In Niassa, almost one quarter of women (24 per cent) were married by the age of 15.  

 

GIRLS Inspire in Mozambique

The project will focus on ten districts in the central and northern regions of Mozambique – namely Cabo Delgado province (Moeda, Muedumbe and Montepuez), Nampula province (Meconta and Rapale), Niassa province (Cuamba, Lago and Mandimba) and Tete province (Moatize and Angónia) – where girls’ education is low and early marriages are high.

In Mozambique, the collaboration between the Commonwealth of Learning (COL), the Associação Progresso and Ajuda De Desenvolvimento De Povo Para Povo (ADPP) works to strengthen its own organisations, to raise awareness within communities about the barriers to girls’ empowerment and to provide learning opportunities in order to empower those who are currently married (victims of child marriage) and those at risk of early marriage.

The focus of Associação Progresso will be to raise awareness in the target districts to bring to light the harmful impact to society of child, early and forced marriage and other gender-based discrimination and violence.

Meanwhile, Ajuda De Desenvolvimento De Povo Para Povo (ADPP) will work on improving access to education and life skills for disadvantages girls and enhance their assertiveness and self-supportiveness in Nampula province.

Outcomes

Outcome 1

Institutions improve institutional capacity to design and deliver quality gender sensitive skills-oriented learning programs for girls and women and increase their technical skills to leverage open and distance learning (ODL) which address the barriers girls and women experience, among local partners.

Outcome 3

Girls increase their knowledge about their health and social rights and the negative consequences of child, early and forced marriage (CEFM), gain skills that are locally relevant and validated by the labour market, and have aspirations for employment.

Partners
Associação Progresso
Location: Mozambique
Ajuda de Desenvolvimento de Povo para Povo (ADPP)
Location: Mozambique
Resources
Child, early and forced marriage
Gender Equality
Practical Tools for Educators
Child Marriage
Source: UNICEF
Child Marriage
Source: Royal Commonwealth Society, Plan UK
Child Marriage
Source: UNESCO Education for All Global Monitoring
Child Marriage
Source: UNICEF Mozambique
Gender Equality
Source: UNESCO Education for All Global Monitoring
Child Marriage Situation in Mozambique
Source: Girls Not Brides
Child Marriage
Source: Care International
Child Marriage in Africa
Source: UNICEF
Gender Equality and Girls Education
Source: Plan International
Child Marriage
Source: Girls Not Brides
Gender Equality - Voice Agency
Source: World Bank Group
Gender Profile Mozambique
Source: COL
Sex Disaggregated Data - Select Indicators: Africa
Source: COL